The initial name of this blog was ‘random-digit’ for some reason. I’ve always been fascinated by how randomness can lead to art.

On my new pet-project I’ve designed a mini processor to generate random images.
This is the gist:
  • The processor has a basic set of registers (x,y,r,g,b) and optionally up-to N ‘general purpose’ registers ( r0… rN); all registers are floats.
  • The code of the processor is a list of attributions in the format <register> = <expression>. 
  • The <expressions> are binary trees with the nodes containing one operator ( + , – , / or  * ) and the leafs are any of: any register, a constant value X, Pi, sin(<expression>), cos(<expression>), sqrt(<expression>) or simply <expression>.
  • The number of such attributions is configurable. E.g. here’s an example of 16 attributions code:
    •     y = r2 – r0
          y = x * y
          r1 = r / y
          r = x – y
          r2 = b * r2
          x = g * sin(x + 0)
          r2 = x – 0.30149573
          g = r1 / b
          x = r1 + r2
          r0 = r2 – r2
          g = r0 / g
          g = PI – r0
          r = r0 + y
          g = r + r0
          g = r + cos(cos((r1 + 0.9902641) – b) – r)
          r = r – 0
          r0 = b + g
          y = 0 * x
          r1 = x – g
          y = b + r2
          r = g / r0
          x = r0 * x
          r2 = y / r2
          y = g + y
          y = b * r2
          r0 = cos(g + PI) / x
          x = r0 – y
          b = r2 + 0
          r2 = y / g
          y = r * y
The ’emulator’ will then iterate over the randomly generated code and at the end of each full  execution will place a pixel of color (r,g,b) on position (x,y) and then resume from start. The absolute and modulus 1 of the registers  (val = abs(r) %1f) is applied to ensure the output value is within the image and a valid color.
Naturally most of the “software” is trash and is automatically discarded. From the rest, I manually discard many it for being too boring, and on occasion some is kept because ‘it looks nice’. 🙂
Here’s a couple of those: